News from AAEP

AAEP

Dr. Steve Naile Honored as AAEP Good Works Recipient for March

The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) congratulates Dr. Steve Naile, the March honoree of the Good Works for Horses Campaign, for protecting the welfare of horses by voluntarily training, educating and assisting law enforcement in the identification and pursuit of cases of equine cruelty and neglect. Good Works for Horses honors AAEP-member practitioners who perform volunteer service to benefit horses and the equine community. Horse owners and veterinary professionals are encouraged to nominate AAEP members for this monthly recognition.

Request Research Funding from the AAEP Foundation by June 15

The AAEP Foundation, the charitable arm of the American Association of Equine Practitioners, is now accepting grant proposals from AAEP-member graduate students and residents for up to $20,000 in funding for the study of key diseases and disorders affecting equine health. The submission deadline is June 15.

Save the Date for the AAEP’s 2019 Continuing Education Opportunities

Expand and refine your skill set by attending one—or more—of the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ (AAEP) continuing education events in 2019.  This year’s calendar of events includes one 360° meeting, which focuses on small-group learning and hands-on wet labs; the Summer Focus Conference & Labs, which will feature two tracks and offer both lectures and labs; and the world’s largest continuing education event dedicated to equine medicine, the much-anticipated Annual Convention.

News from TheHorse.com

The Horse

Your Guide to Equine Health Care

3 Things Not to Say When Selling a Horse

How you represent a horse for sale to potential buyers is serious business. What you say could inadvertently create liability for you, so choose your words carefully.

The post 3 Things Not to Say When Selling a Horse appeared first on The Horse.

Safe Horse Handling for Vet Visits

What's the best way to handle a horse so he remains calm and well-behaved during vet and farrier visits?

The post Safe Horse Handling for Vet Visits appeared first on The Horse.

10 Years of Upper Respiratory Diseases in Horses

The ongoing Equine Respiratory Biosurveillance Program revealed new information on infectious respiratory disease threats, including EHV-1 and EHV-4, influenza, S. equi, and equine rhinitis A/B viruses, and more. Here's what you should know.

The post 10 Years of Upper Respiratory Diseases in Horses appeared first on The Horse.

The core vaccines: EEE/WEE, Rabies, West Nile Virus, Tetanus

Please read this article from Equus Magazine for important information about protecting your horse.

By Heidi Furseth

A number of dreadful diseases are now very rare among horses — thanks to some of the simplest and cheapest preventive measures we have.

Vaccination easily ranks as one one of the single most important things you do to protect your horse’s health. In fact, vaccines have been so successful that it’s rare to even hear of horses contracting several dreadful diseases that once loomed as a constant threat.

It is worthwhile, though, to remember what those injections are doing—especially the four “core” vaccines the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) recommends for every horse.[More]

Fractures: Beyond the Limbs

They might be less common, but skull, rib, pelvis, and withers fractures are no less important. Learn more about fractures in this article from The Horse magazine.

By Joan Norton, VMD, Dipl. ACVIM

A broken bone in a large quadruped is serious stuff. Unlike a kid with a broken arm, you can’t just slap a cast on a horse and send him on his way. Thankfully, fractures aren’t frequent occurrences in horses. When they do happen the most common site is in the distal limb, particularly the cannon bone. But bones can break in a variety of places, and understanding the causes and associated complications will help you become more familiar with these less-common but no-less-important potential fracture sites.[More]

EHV-1: What Are We Learning?

An informative article from The Horse magazine:

By Heather Smith Thomas

There’s a life-threatening disease horses can harbor in their bodies without showing any signs of illness. But under stress—even inapparent stress—the horse can disperse the virus with every cough or sneeze, exposing nearby equids to the pathogen. All of this can happen undetected until, perhaps, a horse in the same barn turns up with a fever or another begins showing neurologic signs.

This nightmarish scenario can mark the start of an equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) outbreak, which most frequently occurs where horses congregate, such as at horse shows, trail rides, or barns with transient populations.[More]

Does your feeding program measure up?

Equus Magazine has a good article about feeding routines:

Take a moment to consider whether your feeding routine still provides the right amount of nutrients and calories for your horse.

by Laurie Bonner

Routines can be comforting. When balancing the demands of career, family and barn, it feels good to simply work your way through familiar chores—first the water, then the hay. Then a trip to the feed room, and with a can of this and a scoop of that, you’re done. Your reward, of course, is the sweet sound of munching in every stall. [More]

What your veterinarian wants you to know about antibiotics

Check out this article published in Equus Magazine.

by Melinda Freckleton, DVM

It’s easy to be casual about antibiotics. We’ve all taken them ourselves, they look like any other medication, and if you’ve had horses for any length of time, you are probably quite familiar with the “crush and dump” routine. But the nature of antibiotics requires a level of understanding and vigilance that goes beyond those required by many other medications that the average horse owner is likely to administer. [More]

Prevention: Sand Collic

Is your horse ingesting too much sand? Learn more in this article in Equus Magazine.

by Laurie Bonner

Horses who graze on loose, sandy soil are at risk of sand colic, which can occur if they ingest too much dirt with their forage. The consequences can range from very mild, transient digestive upsets, when the particles irritate the gut wall, to impactions or twists (volvulus), which can occur if large amounts of sand settle out of the ingesta and accumulate in the large intestine. [More]