News from AAEP

AAEP

Colorado State University Professor Joins AAEP Board of Directors 

Luke Bass, DVM, MS, DABVP, assistant professor and head of the Equine Field Service at the Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, has joined the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ board of directors. Dr. Bass was installed during the Dec. 4 President’s Luncheon at the AAEP’s 64th Annual Convention in San Francisco, Calif. His three-year term expires in 2021. 

AAEP Past President Dr. Tom Lenz Honored with Sage Kester Beyond the Call Award

Thomas R. Lenz, DVM, MS, DACT, semi-retired equine veterinarian of Louisburg, Kas., received the AAEP’s Sage Kester Beyond the Call Award for his unparalleled commitment to equine welfare and veterinary medicine. He was honored during the Dec. 4 President’s Luncheon at the AAEP’s 64th Annual Convention in San Francisco, Calif. 

Virginia Practice Owner Joins AAEP Board of Directors for Three-Year Term

Mitchell K. Rode, DVM, founding owner of Clarke Equine - Wellness and Performance in Berryville, Va., has joined the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ board of directors. Dr. Rode was installed during the Dec. 4 President’s Luncheon at the AAEP’s 64th Annual Convention in San Francisco, Calif. He will complete his term in 2021. 

News from TheHorse.com

The Horse

Your Guide to Equine Health Care

Unintentional Equine Neglect and Abuse: A Concern in Kentucky

A recent Kentucky Equine Networking Meeting focused on the legal process surrounding equine neglect and abuse cases.

The post Unintentional Equine Neglect and Abuse: A Concern in Kentucky appeared first on The Horse.

What to Do if a Horse Tests Positive for Salmonella

The bacterium Salmonella enterica can spread quickly between horses on a farm or in a hospital setting, causing significant financial and even equine losses. Here's how one veterinarian recommends managing positive cases.

The post What to Do if a Horse Tests Positive for <em>Salmonella</em> appeared first on The Horse.

Horses Surrendered From Virginia Rescue Farm

More than 40 horses are receiving rehabilitative care after being surrendered by the operators of Eagle Hill Equine Rescue, located near Fredericksburg, Virginia.

The post Horses Surrendered From Virginia Rescue Farm appeared first on The Horse.

The core vaccines: EEE/WEE, Rabies, West Nile Virus, Tetanus

Please read this article from Equus Magazine for important information about protecting your horse.

By Heidi Furseth

A number of dreadful diseases are now very rare among horses — thanks to some of the simplest and cheapest preventive measures we have.

Vaccination easily ranks as one one of the single most important things you do to protect your horse’s health. In fact, vaccines have been so successful that it’s rare to even hear of horses contracting several dreadful diseases that once loomed as a constant threat.

It is worthwhile, though, to remember what those injections are doing—especially the four “core” vaccines the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) recommends for every horse.[More]

Fractures: Beyond the Limbs

They might be less common, but skull, rib, pelvis, and withers fractures are no less important. Learn more about fractures in this article from The Horse magazine.

By Joan Norton, VMD, Dipl. ACVIM

A broken bone in a large quadruped is serious stuff. Unlike a kid with a broken arm, you can’t just slap a cast on a horse and send him on his way. Thankfully, fractures aren’t frequent occurrences in horses. When they do happen the most common site is in the distal limb, particularly the cannon bone. But bones can break in a variety of places, and understanding the causes and associated complications will help you become more familiar with these less-common but no-less-important potential fracture sites.[More]

EHV-1: What Are We Learning?

An informative article from The Horse magazine:

By Heather Smith Thomas

There’s a life-threatening disease horses can harbor in their bodies without showing any signs of illness. But under stress—even inapparent stress—the horse can disperse the virus with every cough or sneeze, exposing nearby equids to the pathogen. All of this can happen undetected until, perhaps, a horse in the same barn turns up with a fever or another begins showing neurologic signs.

This nightmarish scenario can mark the start of an equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) outbreak, which most frequently occurs where horses congregate, such as at horse shows, trail rides, or barns with transient populations.[More]